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Asides

BuddyPress for the World

Happy to announce that BuddyPress is now available to the world. BuddyPress is a package built on top of WordPress which transforms WP into a social network complete with profiles, friends, messaging, groups, and even activity streams. Of course it’s 100% GPL and Open Source. It’s built on top of MU (which can be tricky to install) so still not for everybody yet, but this is a major milestone in the WordPress world. Check it out. Congrats to Andy and the whole BuddyPress team. 🙂 Here’s Andy’s official  announcement post and WordPress.org.

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Asides

Spam SEO

Eliminating spam is good SEO.

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Asides

Wired Joins the Family

I wanted to take a moment to welcome Wired.com’s 12 blogs to the WordPress family! (They just completed their switch from Typepad.) I thought this completes my prediction from January that WP would reach over 40% of this list of top blogs, but when I went to the Technorati 100 today everything has changed! First, they only show ten blogs at a time now (lame!) and second there appears to have been huge churn on the list,so we’ll have to wait until next January to do an apples-to-apples comparison.

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Asides

WP.com

Automattic / WordPress.com now has WP.com!

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Asides

WordPress CodeSniffer

WordPress CodeSniffer Standard. Helps you format your code in wp-style.

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Asides

PollDaddy PHP

PollDaddy just finished their big switch from ASP.NET/SQL to PHP/MySQL. Go and give the guys a virtual Guinness.

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Automattic Essays

Blo.gs Lives On

Do you guys remember Blo.gs? In addition to being a cool domain, it’s a ping-update service like Ping-O-Matic that was started by Jim Winstead and acquired by Yahoo in June of 2005.

Some exciting news today: Yahoo! is transferring blo.gs to Automattic for safekeeping and further development. I’ve been a long-time fan of the service, and it even inspired the early WordPress feature which reordered your blogroll based on update times.

We’re looking forward to beefing up the service and giving it a refresh, while continuing its reputation for reliability. It makes me nostalgic to hear the name “blo.gs” again, I even still have the t-shirt they made for a Feedmesh meetup years ago. (For a big blast from the past, check out the discussion around feedmesh and real-time, distributed updates. Everything old is new again.) Major kudos to Yahoo! for giving us the chance to do so — I think most companies would have just shuttered it.

Toni has a few more thoughts.

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Asides

Blogs Are Dead

Blogs are dead; long live the blog by Andrew Keen after our dinner in Amsterdam last week.

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Essays WordPress

Sun, Oracle, WordPress, and MySQL

It’s magically beautiful outside in San Francisco today, but instead everyone is talking about the $7.4 billion acquisition of Sun Microsystems by Oracle. (More on Techmeme.) A number of people have contacted me with questions to the effect of “Oracle is evil, they now own MySQL, WordPress runs on MySQL, OMG! What’s next?” In addition to the millions of WordPress blogs all using MySQL, all of the projects Automattic contributes to are MySQL-based and we run more than 250 servers dedicated to MySQL.

Last Thursday at The Next Web I talked about how we need an Internet Bill of Rights to protect our data and the countless hours we pour into complex online services, such as Facebook and Last.fm, and that the foundations for this were laid down 20 years ago by Richard Stallman and the GPL.

Today our servers are running various versions of MySQL, tomorrow they’ll be running the same thing, and if need be ten years from now they can run the exact some software. Because of the GPL every WordPress user in the world is protected — we’re not beholden to any one company, only to what works best for us. Today that’s MySQL, tomorrow that’s MySQL, a year from now we’ll see.

Most importantly whatever happens will happen on our timeline. That’s the definition of Freedom.

Here are few other reasons not to be worried, and a bonus at the end.

  1. Oracle bought Innobase, makers of the InnoDB engine that most large users deploy as their main storage engine, in October 2005. The sky has not yet fallen.
  2. As a company Automattic has never really needed the support services that MySQL provides and even if we did there are plenty of third parties also providing support.
  3. Most of the useful updates for MySQL have been coming from outside, to quote Jeremy Zawodny:

    The single most interesting and surprising thing to me is both the number and necessity of third-party patches for enhancing various aspects of MySQL and InnoDB. Companies like Percona, Google, Proven Scaling, Prime Base Technologies, and Open Query are all doing so in one way or another.

    On the one hand, it’s excellent validation of the Open Source model. Thanks to reasonable licensing, companies other than Sun/MySQL are able to enhance and fix the software and give their changes back to the world.

  4. In terms of innovation, the most interesting developments have been from outside as well, in projects like Drizzle. (I would not be surprised if this moment is for Drizzle what Movable Type changing their licensing was for WordPress, even though in this case they’re both Open Source.)
  5. I’ve met a number of people at Sun who are incredibly smart, and if they stick around I expect cool things to continue to come out.
  6. There are some new developments in the WordPress world, namely that I think it would be possible to add support for databases other than MySQL without changing every $wpdb call or breaking any plugins or themes. It won’t be easy, but the coolest stuff seldom is.

Anyway, I now really wish I had agreed to keynote at the MySQL User Conference starting today. 🙂

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Gallery

Next Web, day 2

Second day at the Next Web conference in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

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Gallery

Next Web, day 1

First day at the Next Web Conference in Amesterdam, Netherlands, followed by dinner and party.

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Gallery

Visiting Shindo Labs

Visiting the Shindo Laboratories showroom, pork ramen, and then leaving Tokyo, Japan.

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Gallery

Kyoto to Tokyo

Travel from Kyoto to Tokyo, exploring Tokyo and Akihabara / Akiba, and the pre-WordCamp dinner.

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Asides

WordPress Authors Wanted

Wiley is looking for savvy WordPress folks to author new books they want to publish. If you love writing and are a WordPress wizard than contact Carol Long.

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Gallery

WordCamp Kansai 2009

Exploring urban Osaka, including some rougher areas, and then WordCamp Kansai that night, which was basically a dinner with speakers.

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Asides Yahoo

Google Analytics script

40% still use old Google Analytics script. Don’t forget to update to the newest Google Analytics script call.  (And drop in WordPress.com Stats while you’re in there to get something quick and author-centric.)

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Asides Yahoo

New WordCamp SF Site

The new site for WordCamp San Francisco is online, go check it out. Got some more speakers and announcements when I get back from Japan.

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Gallery

Kyoto Cherry Blossoms

Visiting the cherry blossoms and temples in Kyoto, Japan.

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Asides Yahoo

Scotch Whisky Guide

The Art of Manliness Guide to Scotch Whisky.

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Asides Yahoo

YCombinator and Techstars

YCombinator and Techstars spawning similar startups. I’ve noticed this too, though it’s most likely just good ideas occuring to several folks at once and the seed folks lowering the barrier to entry of starting a company and execution, so we notice more of the confluences.