5 replies on “Online Journalism Review”

  1. It’s a nice write-up about WordPress, but the article also has a few head scratchers, like “…Movable Type is the blogging package chosen by bloggers who care what other bloggers think…”

    And, “If you are looking for street “cred” in the blogosphere, [Movable Type] is the software for you.”

    If I didn’t know better, I’d say those quotes were from an article several years old.

  2. I really don’t like Movable Type, its just too bloated and expensive. I am sorta wanting to go with something like Ruby on Rails and Typo because WP is getting a bit cliche (or maybe just the Kubrick default theme EVERYONE continues to use) but I am a WP loyalist and am very happy with its performance. Whale Salad will defenitly continue to be powered by WP for a long time.

    Just finished reading the article, I guess I needed to read it before writing a reply…

    “most professional bloggers choose to use blogging software that has more prestige (read: is harder to set up and install).” — I really don’t feel this is true, there are many professional bloggers using WP and it takes nearly no advanced knowledge whatsoever to install. Maybe this conclusion was drawn because statistics show many or most blogs right now are powered by MT? (And it just happens to be the most difficult to install) Lots of professional bloggers are moving to WP also; It’s cool to see when Matt mentions a mainstream and well known blogger who writes great content moving to WordPress.

    I feel that this article didn’t really give WordPress all that it deserved. I think that the author misinterpereted the relationship between price and performance. It went in to glorious description of Movable Type, its history, and a lot more information on what type of person would use it. I feel like WordPress got the short end of the stick here, because its really one of the fastest growing blogging platforms out right now.

    You also have to take into consideration how each application works. Moveable Type runs on perl/CGI and WordPress runs on the superfast PHP language. Regardless of the server platform, PHP will perform faster than CGI and Perl, and even faster if a PHP accelerator such as Zend is used.

    There were some things that I did enjoy in this article. I frequently visit iPodlounge.com for I am also a happy iPod owner, and was glad to read that it was powered by PMachine, not neccesarily because it’s powered by PMachine, but because now I know what its powered by! I also liked learning a bit more about each of the other blogging systems.

    I don’t know if anyone else out there notices, but the sexiest blogs that I have ever seen are normally powered by WordPress. Also many of the most innovative things are being implemented on WordPress such as AJAX with live commenting and live search. And there are defenitly more plugins for WP than carter has liver pills.

    Well I guess thats it for my ramblings. Sorry if I interchanged WP and WordPress too much. Hopefully there will be some more comments on this article and I guess I will need to post these on the article’s page too. But by the time this comment is done there will be probably twenty more above mine. Right now there is only one comment.

    Love your blog Matt and love what your doing for WordPress. Can’t wait till 1.6 and now that my own blog is spic-and-span I’d love to help with WP development.

  3. Guess you have to be 18 to comment, pretty lame. Its funny that the site is part of USC, that went completely unnoticed by me until I was done reading it. I guess it was good I commented before noticing it was a USC site because I am defenitly a mega hardcore uscfan (hence my email address, del.icio.us username, xbox gamertag, flickr username, etc…) or my true feelings on the article would have been tweaked.

  4. Matt,

    in the comparison table of features – the most obvious feature missing from WordPress is a picture gallery – almost all the others have one, and WordPress has almost everything else!

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