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Default Spam Handling

Dougal takes a look at built-in spam measures in WP and SpamLookup, I think we could integrate more in the next release.

5 replies on “Default Spam Handling”

I’m on a rolled-my-own blog, so I haven’t had much of a spam problem to date. But it’s nice to see that comment-filters are moving beyond simpleminded yes/no’s and into the realm of statistical analysis.

Honestly, the current spam handling built into WordPress works fine for me. I haven’t had much if any spam get through since I upgraded to 1.5. That and the theme handling are my favorite features in WP 1.5.

I haven’t gotten any spam on my 1.5. But it was also the same time I purchased and moved to my own space. So maybe they just haven’t noticed it yet…

… But it’s been nice ^_^

WordPress 上的 SpamLookup

Matt 在看到 MT 上的 SpamLookup 後,打算把這些功能在下個版本 implement 出來:Default Spam Handling。

FeatureSpamLookup PluginWordPress Core
IP-based lookupYesNo
Domain-based lookupYesNo
TrackBack IP check *YesNo
Passphrase …

I think that 1.5 does a great job when it comes to content moderation. After I placed the words that were most common in the comment spam I received, I’ve had very few comments slip through the filter. In those rare cases, I just have to add another word (typically a misspelling) to the moderation list. However, I think that the blacklist feature could use some work. I’m afraid to blacklist a comment based on a word or even a phrase because it is possible that a real comment could be deleted.

Perhaps a blacklist that matches patterns would be more useful. For instance, if I could blacklist all comments that come from a certain IP address and contain a certain word or phrase, that would be very useful. Even more useful would be if this information could be stored on a central server for all WP users. If 25 or more sites (or some other number) marked an IP/word combo as spam, that combo would be considered spam on all WP blogs that have the central blacklist enabled. I’m not sure if this last bit is feasible, but it may be something to consider.

Gmail seems to use the collaborative effect to keep most of the spam in the “Spam” folder. I’m sure a lot of people would like to see something similar with WordPress. I do want to add that I really like the whitelist aspect for future comments from approved commenters. Great idea, great implementation!

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