Categories
Asides

WordPress Malaysia Logo

Malaysia is celebrating 50 years of Merdeka and Avijit made these cool WordPress logos to celebrate.

Categories
Asides

Plugin Competition Winners

The winners of the WordPress Plugin Competition have been announced.

Categories
Asides

WordCamp Beijing

There’s going to be a WordCamp Beijing! Almost 200 people have signed up already. Here’s some English info about it. If you’re planning a WordCamp in your town let me know and I’ll blog about it to help get the word out in your area.

Categories
Asides

MovableType 4 vs. WordPress 2.2

Mashable compared MovableType 4 and WordPress 2.2. I wouldn’t agree with Byrne that “Movable Type 4.0 is light years ahead of its predecessor not to mention any other blogging tool on the market” but they have caught up to a lot of basic features — pages, WYSIWYG, pagination, user registration — that have been lacking in the platform for a while. That, plus the fact that they support WordPress imports and cloned our pages API does show that they’re gunning for some switchers regardless of what they may say in public. (I’m cool with both of those by the way, it was good of them to adopt existing standards instead of invent new ones. In fact it’d be nice if they could export to WXR as well as it’s pretty semantically rich and the current MT export format leaves a lot of important stuff out, like slugs.)

Categories
Asides

IIS Authentication Plugin

IIS Authentication plugin for the WordPress PHP blogging engine. So wrong, yet so right.

Categories
Asides

WordPress India Logo

A special WordPress India Logo, in celebration of 60 years of independence.

Categories
Asides

Tumble-Hybrid

Transforming Your WordPress into a Tumble-Hybrid, we’re halfway there. Now someone should do a few awesome Tumblr-like styles around it. Projectionist is the first I saw and a great example of the medium.

Categories
Asides

WordCamp Roundups

I’m still recovering from the conference this weekend. It was really amazing in both the people who attended and the quality of the presentations. Anyone have a good roundup post or liveblog any sessions? Leave it in the comments. The session pages are picking up pingbacks but seem to be missing some good stuff.

Categories
Asides

KRON on WordCamp

KRON 4’s Brian Shields Reports on Wordcamp.

Categories
Asides

Screencast and Videoblogging

The Show in a Box project has made a screencast called How To Install And Setup WordPress. According to Jay Dedman, “Showinabox.tv is our new project to help videobloggers simply download a folder, install, turn on plugins, and choose a theme. All open source. Basically make the “ultimate videoblogging platform using WordPress”. It’ll showcase videos using vPIP, build a visual archive, help with categories, and offer a community funding mechanism.” Cool!

Categories
Ask Matt Essays

Price of Freedom

I got asked an interesting question today:

The only thing why (at least) I encode the footer is to prevent people from removing my designer link. I usually spend around 6 hours designing the graphics and coding the theme and some people simply take my link off and some of them even dare to write that the theme was designed and coded by them! How would you feel if someone took your WordPress script (since it’s free) and said they made it? Wouldn’t you like to bite their head off?

The response became too long for a comment, so here it is:

Kate, thousands of people every day remove the WordPress link, or my link, or search and replace the WP logo with their own and redistribute it, use it to spam, distribute hate speech, or any number of awful things you can imagine. So why have hundreds of people spent thousands of hours working on it?

Though the freedom intrinsic in the GPL that has allowed people to abuse WordPress it has allowed even more people to do amazing things and over time the good far, far outweighs the bad. Most importantly I feel like WordPress would have never gotten off the ground if it hadn’t been open from the beginning. (In fact there were several more functional blogging programs started around the same time that have since withered away.)

Ultimately I know our software isn’t going to change anyone’s spots. Good people will do good things with it, and bad people will do bad things with it — regardless of any protections I put in place. Windows Vista, a multi-billion dollar enterprise, was cracked within days. Does any piddling encoding I can do in PHP really matter? If protection like that isn’t broken it’s a statement of popularity, not security. I suppose could harass the bad guys, shut down their host, send them scary letters, but it’s just going to stress me out and like cockroaches they’ll pop up someplace else. I also know that most projects, software, and ideas die from obscurity, not piracy.

If you accept that bad people are going to be bad then the real question becomes how do you maximize the effect of the good instead of treating them just like the bad. (No one likes to be treated like a criminal.) In my brief experience here’s three things that work:

  1. Give people the tools they need to succeed. This can be interpreted on a lot of levels, but personally I’ve found at the most base the freedoms provided by the GPL and other open source licenses are incredibly empowering.
  2. Celebrate the successes. Talk, connect, promote, and embrace the people who are creating things on top of your creation. (The best revenge against someone doing something bad is helping create something awesome.)
  3. Provide a way for people to choose to help you, and try to remove as much friction from that process as possible. Now that you’ve ignored the bad people and delighted the good, by their very nature they’ll want to give something back.

The success stories around this model are numerous and growing every day. People can and do rip-off the entire Wikipedia, but it’s still become one of the top ten sites on the internet and a marvel of what can happen when you let go. (Not to mention it is run entirely on open source software.) WordPress itself was built on top of a pre-existing GPL product called b2/cafelog. Anyone can run the software behind our hosted service WordPress.com and create competitive sites, and many have, but it hasn’t hurt us one bit. Linux, GNU, and the thousands of related desktop projects haven’t taken a bit longer than folks had hoped, but the impact they’re having, especially on emerging economies, is dramatic. The list goes on and on. It’s not hard to join the movement, but first you have to figure out who you’re fighting, who you’re trying to help, and if the price of freedom is something you’re willing to embrace.

Categories
Asides

WPMU-based Social Network

Chickspeak is a WordPress MU based social network. “I recently completed my biggest project yet; a fully fledged social network aimed at female college students. The difference? It’s built on WordPress MU.”

Categories
Asides

Automattic and Six Apart

Read/WriteWeb has a good article about Automattic and Six Apart.

Categories
Asides

Short History of WordPress MultiUser

A Short History of WordPress MultiUser (WPMU).

Categories
Asides

The Police Blogs

I’m in Dallas where I saw The Police with my sister. (The tickets were her birthday present.) Afterward I was checking out their respective website and it looks like Andy Summers, the guitarist, has a WordPress blog. His site also has some interesting essays and photography.

Categories
Asides

Japan Meetup

I just read on Detlog there is a WordPress Japan meetup in Okayama on July 1. I just got a copy of a new Japanese WP book and it looks pretty neat. I’d love to make it to Japan and one of these meetups someday.

Categories
Asides

Non-Blog WordPress

WordPress Makes Sense For Many Non-Blog Websites.

Categories
Asides

Yahoo’s new CEO

Jerry Yang announced he was becoming Yahoo’s CEO on Yodel Anecdotal, their WordPress blog.

Categories
Asides

More FOAFers

Danny Ayers, semantic web advocate, likes how WordPress handles Iñtërnâtiônàlizætiøn. Jim Ley, another RDF/FOAF guy, has also switched to WordPress. Where are they coming from?